Side Hustles: A Career Consultant’s Perspective

When Suzy Lawson with The Entrepreneuress Within reached out to me this week to ask me to submit a guest post about different types of businesses and how to choose a side hustle from my perspective as a career consultant, client stories began rushing back to me as I reminisced on my time with each one. I also thought of how interesting her request was to have fallen on Easter weekend as millions will pause for a brief moment to celebrate resurrection and life.

To date Career Direct, a division of Crown Financial (the company I’m certified with) has helped over a quarter million people find direction in line with their personalities, interests, skills, and values. We’ve been featured in Relevant Magazine and Fox News, and universities you may have heard of (Lee in Cleveland, TN and Liberty in Virginia, to name a few) are using our assessments among their student bodies.

It’s the assessment that helped me move forward with my MBA, which in turn made me eligible to teach in a local college. It also helped me realize my passions and gave me “permission” to expand The Referrals Group into the Southeast. We’ve started three new groups since June 2017 and will be starting a fourth in a few more weeks with more on the horizon.

While I’m building my passion, being certified has allowed me to make extra income by helping others who are struggling with what they either want to do as a side hustle or a complete career change. It cost me several hundred dollars to be certified, but I made that back the first week. If someone offers you a side hustle opportunity without some sort of investment (whether it be time, money, or other resources), be wary. There’s always an opportunity cost if it’s legitimate. In addition, don’t overprice your side hustle. But don’t underprice it either. Research. Know the ins and out. Become an expert at it.

I haven’t had people balk at my pricing for the assessment process as it sets people up for future success. I know it works and have witnessed transformation, so I never apologize for my pricing. It’s worth every penny and then some.

I’m sure some of you might be thinking, “Yeah, I’ve taken those personality tests, and they’re pretty much all the same. They tell me I need to be a _____________, and I don’t want to be a _____________.” Or maybe you don’t want to go back to school or maybe you feel too old and you’ve missed your chance. This is why it’s important to have someone who has been trained and is skilled in reading people, interpreting results, asking the right questions, etc to help you delve deep and pull out those dreams that may have gotten buried long ago. Or if your son or daughter is on their way to college, it helps to have an unbiased person who has no agenda whatsoever help them peel back the layers of who they are and give them some tools for future decision making.

I’m honored to have worked with the kid who couldn’t decide between studying to be an orthopaedic surgeon or a financial advisor. I was able to help him work through those two scenarios, and for him it came down to his personal values of time, family, friends, and travel. He’s now a student at the University of GA working on his MBA in finance.

And the woman who was in mid career transition who started a non profit based on her passion for animals.

And the former addict who needed to be reminded he has been given so many gifts and talents and that his passion for sales was legitimate despite what his father wanted.

And the beautiful young woman who suffered from severe depression who now has a wide open beautiful world of opportunity in her future.

I tell you these stories because at the end of the day, if our work isn’t contributing to people’s lives in a positive manner, perhaps we need to rethink what we are doing.

What is your life work doing to help other people? Are you working in your passion? If not, this week The Entrepreneuress Within has provided some great tools to help you get unstuck and to give you ideas and choices to do something different.

If I can ever be of service to you to help you in the first step of discovering yourself again so you can have some fresh wind in your sails to pursue a new adventure, I’m always a click away.

Thanks again Suzy for seeking my perspective. Happy Easter weekend everyone. May the resurrection of our Lord remind you He makes all things new, including our side hustles.

#PeopleMatter

Fire the Resume

Some may consider the writing and review of a resume to be compared to the pain and unfairness of life the prince bemoaned in his opening soliloquy of the Nunnery Scene in William Shakespeare’s play Hamlet. To the delight of these “Prince Hamlets,” some forward thinkers and futurists think that LinkedIn will eventually replace the resume. However, according to Glassdoor, you need both. They compare the resume and LinkedIn profile as a marriage of sorts, creating “a beautiful career communications union” while maintaining independence where values and personality are concerned.

Conversely, Workfolio claims their web application is the resume of the future. Bloomberg TV recently featured an interview with Workfolio founder and CEO Charles Pooley, who claims that 90% of first impressions are now made online and that “self promotion is the new self preservation.” To help the viewing audience understand why their application is effective and catching the attention of hiring managers, Pooley provides some pretty dismal statistics:

  •  70% of job openings are never published
  • On average, 150-300 resumes are submitted for each posted job position
  • A typical job search takes 8 months

And as if that cloudy forecast isn’t enough, consider the recent survey results published by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) on how HR professionals view resumes. Work experience gaps on a resume often result in automatic disqualification, even when there may be valid rationale behind them, especially in the cases for individuals pursuing ventures not directly related to their career or military veterans transitioning back to civilian life. And while job-tailored, chronologically ordered resumes tend to get noticed first, your resume could likely get overlooked as 76% of recruiters spend less than 5 minutes reviewing a resume to determine if the candidate is qualified for a job opening.

So what can you do to make yourself visible to employers? Should you create resume or not? We live in a highly digital, global village now where lines are blurred and boundaries are open with limitless possibilities. Hedge your bets by taking advantage of the fact that both resumes and online presence are important, but prioritize your digital presence, as many experts predict this is the future of the career hunt. 1stGig is a forward-thinking company who encourages employers to embrace the digital world that college kids immerse their lives in. Likewise, VetsBridge alleviates the often grueling task of resume writing for veterans who have possibly been deployed for extended periods of time and are now looking for civilian work.

While 1stGig and VetsBridge will likely always appreciate the value of a resume of sorts (and encourages everyone to have one on hand for discussions that take place after the initial match), the proprietary recruiting model challenges employers to focus on “career opportunity profiles” which are then 100% matched with an individual’s interests and skills to encourage a conversation to meet some pretty awesome undiscovered talent.

What’s great about focusing on the career opportunity instead? This allows both employers and potentials for these careers to focus on a longer term picture when considering opportunities. Recruiters can start building a flow of candidates and have conversations about opportunities before a “role” even opens up at the company. Maybe this helps shape a role that’s not yet created, playing to the ideal candidate’s skills and experiences. And for potentials, this allows them to step back, get clear about who they are, what they’re seeking, and pursue matches that are more than just any last resort, entry-level role.

We like to call it #FireTheResume.

majority of recruiters spend less than 5 minutes reviewing resumes