Talent Communities – The Future of Recruiting Millennials

No job postings. Talent community. Corporate insider. More human interaction. Google hangouts. Biweekly tweetchats. Relationship building. Interests and skills. Hire for attitude and personality. Matches. Connections. All these are buzz phrases you will likely hear more and more as the workforce landscape continues to morph and change in the 21st Century.

Information technology and recessions have allowed, encouraged, and in some cases, forced entrepreneurship, globalization, organizational restructuring, and a diversified workforce unlike anything we have ever seen in the past. More women are working, more dual-income families exist, and even post-retirement individuals are taking on jobs.

Enter Millennials. According to an article written by Joan Snyder Kuhl, this generation (aka generation Y) are 80 million strong in the U.S. alone. They are the most educated, the most diverse, and have different talents and needs than other generations. According to the Pew Research Center, “millennials will be roughly 50 percent of the U.S. workforce by 2020 and 75 percent of the global workforce by 2030.” What’s disturbing about these numbers is according to a 2011 Gallup survey the unemployment rate among this group remains at 30 percent.

Millennials

With Baby boomers aggressively retiring, employers will experience huge gaps of expertise and talent if they don’t start engaging millennials now. There are no other options – millennials are the future – no ifs, ands, or buts about it. If companies want to continue to be innovative and attract and keep future talent, now is the time to include millennials in their future business strategy. Your company’s culture, management style, and onboarding practices must appeal to them. Google and Apple are prime examples of companies who are already excelling at this. Zappos is not far behind and has stepped out of the proverbial job board box with their “No Job Postings” recruiting approach.

In June 2014, Dr. John Sullivan examined Zappos’ approach with his “Innovation or Craziness” article. While the article is lengthy, it does provide Zappos (and any other company looking to introduce a new approach to recruiting) some food for thought. The “potential problems” he discusses somewhat outweigh the “advantages,” so the approach will likely continue to be tweaked as they seek to build relationships and make talent connections.

1stGig is a company which takes the “No Job Postings” approach a step further. The online recruitment solution is a career matchmaking system for employers and college students. Today’s future graduates care about a company’s vibe and values, and companies want candidates who fit their culture and requirements. 1stGig separates early career building from job hunting by allowing students to begin networking well before graduation based on shared interests instead of current job openings. The concept is to build a talent pool of like-minded individuals from which to begin crafting roles for the future. The proprietary algorithm works 24/7/365, delivering a constant stream of potential talent based on career profile matches which are 100% pre-qualified and pre-screened.

1stGig allows employers to build talent communities that they (like Zappos) can engage with before a career opportunity is even on the table. Employers simply identify specific areas within the company that would benefit from having a pool of talent to reach out to and then create profiles of what is required for those areas. Once matches are made, employers can invite them into conversations via social media, on-site career days, etc. Having people who are engaged in conversations and who are familiar with employer brands is a great way to extend a career opportunity when the time is right. As these communities share their ideas, concerns, and questions, confidence and synergy is created. When it’s time to hire and onboard, employers already know people within the talent communities thus enabling them to choose the people who best fit their criteria. People who are willing to fully engage with an employer without any promise of a job are the ones who will likely stay for the long haul and fully contribute to the bottom line once an offer is extended.

Congratulations to those companies who are embracing the interests and needs of our up and coming young professionals. As you begin to make connections and build relationships with this group, you will discover creative ideas, innovation, entrepreneurial spirits, and a work ethic that wishes to connect and learn and discover and be recognized for their individuality. Embrace the changes. Make the connections. Discover the possibility of the future.

 

 

Fire the Resume

Some may consider the writing and review of a resume to be compared to the pain and unfairness of life the prince bemoaned in his opening soliloquy of the Nunnery Scene in William Shakespeare’s play Hamlet. To the delight of these “Prince Hamlets,” some forward thinkers and futurists think that LinkedIn will eventually replace the resume. However, according to Glassdoor, you need both. They compare the resume and LinkedIn profile as a marriage of sorts, creating “a beautiful career communications union” while maintaining independence where values and personality are concerned.

Conversely, Workfolio claims their web application is the resume of the future. Bloomberg TV recently featured an interview with Workfolio founder and CEO Charles Pooley, who claims that 90% of first impressions are now made online and that “self promotion is the new self preservation.” To help the viewing audience understand why their application is effective and catching the attention of hiring managers, Pooley provides some pretty dismal statistics:

  •  70% of job openings are never published
  • On average, 150-300 resumes are submitted for each posted job position
  • A typical job search takes 8 months

And as if that cloudy forecast isn’t enough, consider the recent survey results published by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) on how HR professionals view resumes. Work experience gaps on a resume often result in automatic disqualification, even when there may be valid rationale behind them, especially in the cases for individuals pursuing ventures not directly related to their career or military veterans transitioning back to civilian life. And while job-tailored, chronologically ordered resumes tend to get noticed first, your resume could likely get overlooked as 76% of recruiters spend less than 5 minutes reviewing a resume to determine if the candidate is qualified for a job opening.

So what can you do to make yourself visible to employers? Should you create resume or not? We live in a highly digital, global village now where lines are blurred and boundaries are open with limitless possibilities. Hedge your bets by taking advantage of the fact that both resumes and online presence are important, but prioritize your digital presence, as many experts predict this is the future of the career hunt. 1stGig is a forward-thinking company who encourages employers to embrace the digital world that college kids immerse their lives in. Likewise, VetsBridge alleviates the often grueling task of resume writing for veterans who have possibly been deployed for extended periods of time and are now looking for civilian work.

While 1stGig and VetsBridge will likely always appreciate the value of a resume of sorts (and encourages everyone to have one on hand for discussions that take place after the initial match), the proprietary recruiting model challenges employers to focus on “career opportunity profiles” which are then 100% matched with an individual’s interests and skills to encourage a conversation to meet some pretty awesome undiscovered talent.

What’s great about focusing on the career opportunity instead? This allows both employers and potentials for these careers to focus on a longer term picture when considering opportunities. Recruiters can start building a flow of candidates and have conversations about opportunities before a “role” even opens up at the company. Maybe this helps shape a role that’s not yet created, playing to the ideal candidate’s skills and experiences. And for potentials, this allows them to step back, get clear about who they are, what they’re seeking, and pursue matches that are more than just any last resort, entry-level role.

We like to call it #FireTheResume.

majority of recruiters spend less than 5 minutes reviewing resumes

Surviving the Financial Challenges of College

In 2011, I decided to quit my full time job and return to college full time. Wow! What a transition! Switching from a 9-5 job to classes and stairs and students and teachers and homework was something I hadn’t done in nearly 20 years! 1 year later, I have earned my Associates Degree and have 16 months left to earn my Bachelors in Business Administration.

When I began the process of researching my educational options, I was a bit overwhelmed. Everything had changed. Instead of getting a hardback book, I could now opt for an e-book. Homework was completed online rather than the traditional hard copy. I could see my teachers on Facebook and personal lives began blending with school and professional lives. But I must admit, I didn’t miss standing in long lines anymore. I could do most everything online and everthing could be updated instantaneously. I could complete my financial aid profile online, order school books online, sign up for classes online – it was definitely up my alley as I am very tech driven when it comes to making our lives as simple as possible.

As I researched and talked to other students, I realized that most of the ones who were brand new to college had no idea of the ways they could save money. Most kids dutifully lined up at the college bookstore and signed $300-$400 of their financial aid checks over for each semester of books. What most didn’t realize is you could rent most of the books for 1/4 of what you pay at a bookstore. I was instantly peeved at the audaciousness of the bookstores to sell books for upwards of $150 to $200 each for some subjects and then provide a buy back for maybe 1/2 or 1/3 of that.

Nevermind these kids are borrowing student loans in excess of what they need, but between tuition, books, and living expenses – unless their rich daddy pays their way through school – what choice do they have? My parents are extremely good with money, but they’re not millionaires – so I had to come up with a plan.

Keep checking back to this blog. I’ll be discussing the best places to rent your textbooks, how to survive on a college student budget, and probably just my thoughts as I study my way to my Bachelors. At the very least, it should be interesting!